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Diego Rivera and the Language of Flowers

Posted by on Sep 19, 2012 in Past Exhibitions | 0 comments

Diego Rivera and the Language of Flowers

Date: Saturday, October 13, 2012 Time: 1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Speaker: Staff Educator Type: Spotlight Talk Join a Museum educator on Saturdays at 1:30 p.m. or 2:30 p.m. for a focused 20-minute discussion of artwork and exhibitions. Today’s talk is “Diego Rivera and the Language of Flowers.” Norton Simon Museum of Art 411 W. Colorado Boulevard Pasadena, CA...

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After Hours: Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting

Posted by on Sep 19, 2012 in Past Exhibitions | 0 comments

After Hours: Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 Visit while the Gallery is closed to the public and see this blockbuster exhibition focusing on the life and work of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Arguably one of the most dynamic artistic relationships in the history of modern art, this will be the first time these artists’ works will be shown together in Canada. Art of Gallery Of...

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Diego & Frida In San Franciso

Posted by on Sep 19, 2012 in Past Exhibitions | 0 comments

Diego & Frida In San Franciso

Madrone Art Bar in collaboration with City College of San Francisco and The Diego Rivera Mural Project present: Diego and Frida in San Francisco: The Past is Present & Shared Histories Curated by Anthony Torres Diego and Frida in San Francisco: The Past is Present honors the trans-cultural significance of the presence of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in San Francisco in the 1930s and 1940. The exhibition comments on interconnectedness of people and histories by honoring the contribution and legacy of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo to the history of art in San Francisco. Jeffrey Beauchamp / Juan Fuentes / Rupert Garcia / Art Hazelwood/ Ester Hernandez / Carmen Lomas Garza / Calixto Robles / Diane Roby / Jos Sances Public front window installation by Victor Cartagena Exhibition Dates: September 19, 2012 — November 16, 2012 Artists Reception: Saturday, September 22, 5:00 to 8:00pm (Complimentary drink for patrons dressed as Frida Kahlo) / Location: Madrone Art Bar Shared Histories: Diego and Frida in San Francisco is a collaboration between City College of San Francisco Gallery, The Diego Rivera Mural Project and Madrone Art Bar. The exhibition celebrates the return of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo to San Francisco, their remarriage, and Diego’s execution of the Pan American Unity Mural (now at City College) at the Golden Gate International Exposition in...

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Frida Kahlo Y Diego Rivera

Posted by on Sep 19, 2012 in News, Past Exhibitions | 0 comments

Frida Kahlo Y Diego Rivera

Passionate love, marriage, childlessness, affairs, divorce – and yet another reconciling marriage. Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s passionate relationship was turbulent. Many exhibitions have emphasized private and personal matters when presenting works by the two Mexican artists.

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Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting

Posted by on Sep 18, 2012 in Exhibitions, Upcoming Exhibitions | 0 comments

Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting

“Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting”

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Detroit Votes to Raise Taxes to Save Cash-Strapped Museum

Posted by on Sep 18, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Detroit Votes to Raise Taxes to Save Cash-Strapped Museum

Voters in three Michigan counties have defied conventional assumptions about politics and taxes, approving a new property tax — called a millage — that will raise an estimated $23 million dollars for the cash-starved Detroit Institute of Arts.

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Now available: Diego Rivera images from the Detroit Institute of Arts

Posted by on Aug 18, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Now available: Diego Rivera images from the Detroit Institute of Arts

ARTstor and the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) have collaborated to release more than 1,000 images of works by Diego Rivera to the Digital Library.

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Diego Rivera Painting Set to Break Auction Record

Posted by on May 22, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Diego Rivera Painting Set to Break Auction Record

NEW YORK – Mexican artist Diego Rivera’s 1939 oil painting “Girl in Blue and White” could be the most expensive piece of Latin American art ever auctioned. Rivera’s painting could break the auction record, fetching over 7.2 million, at the Sotheby’s Latin American art auction in New York. If it sells for the high end of its $4 million to $6 million estimate, it could double the artist’s previous record of $3 million. The painting, “Niña en azul y blanco,” is a portrait of 10-year-old Juanita Rosas and is from a period in which Rivera captured the innocence of children. The muralist chose the work to illustrate a catalog for a 1949 exhibition celebrating his 50 years of painting, organized by the Mexican National Institute of Fine Arts. “It is very typical of his work, especially of that period,” said Carmen Melian, director of Sotheby’s Latin American Art department. Rivera “painted through the years the children of the help at his home and the neighbor’s, and in particular he painted Juanita several times,” Melian said. It’s Rivera’s most important painting to be auctioned in decades, according to Sotheby’s, which has promoted it as one of his two biggest paintings outside of Mexico and says it is hitting the market at the right time. Just last year the Museum of Modern Art featured a solo exhibit of Rivera’s work. “What I love the most is that it was painted in his studio,” Melian said of the painting. “I have been in his studio and the floor there has been dyed green, that’s why it is green in the piece. And the white wall in the background, with its mix of blue and pink, is almost like a Monet or a Renoir; the front is more realistic, the figure of the kid pops out.” Rivera’s current record is $3,082,500 for the 1928 oil on canvas “Baile en Tehuantepec,” (“Dancing in Tehuantepec”) sold in 1995 at Sotheby’s in New York. “Niña en azul y blanco” could even break the auction record for Latin American art, held since 2008 by Mexican Rufino Tamayo’s “Troubadour.” “You never know,” Melian said. “You don’t see a piece like this one very often.” Reporting by the Associated...

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The Last Pedestrians: Albert Kahn, Edsel Ford, Diego Rivera

Posted by on May 15, 2012 in News | 0 comments

The Last Pedestrians: Albert Kahn, Edsel Ford, Diego Rivera

The Last Pedestrians: Albert Kahn, Edsel Ford, Diego Rivera – By Jerry Herron The story of the automobile — like the story of the city of Detroit — is a tale of unwitting eternal returns. At every turn the inventors of modern life — of its machines, its aspirations — seemed unable or unwilling to grasp the meaning of what they were in the process of creating and unleashing, and what they were thus undoing and destroying. Among these creators of modern life was the architect Albert Kahn, who emigrated from Germany in 1880, at age 11, with his mother and five siblings. His father, a rabbi, had already arrived in Detroit. Young Albert showed artistic talent, and with the help of his teacher, the sculptor Julius Melchers, secured a position as office boy in the firm of Mason & Rice, architects to Detroit’s elite carriage trade. Albert prospered there (despite his color blindness, which he concealed by memorizing the precise hue of every object in the office) and soon was ready to strike out independently. In 1895 Kahn founded his own practice and quickly became the most important architect in Detroit — as it happens, this was just as the horse-drawn carriage would give way to the motorcar, and as the horseless carriages produced in the city’s great factories would start inexorably to transform America’s cities and landscapes.  Between 1910 and 1930 — when most of downtown Detroit was created — Kahn personally executed one-quarter of all the architectural commissions in the city. By the time of his death, in 1942, he had produced over 1,900 buildings, and his designs had served to monumentalize the burgeoning civic culture: the YWCA, the YMCA, the Maccabees Building, the National Theater, the First National Bank Building, the neoclassical General Motors World Headquarters and, across Grand Boulevard, his crowning achievement, the 28-story art deco headquarters he executed in 1928 for the Fisher Brothers, auto body suppliers for GM. But the project that got built was dwarfed by the project that might have been: Kahn’s original design for the Fishers incorporated two 26-story towers, each anchoring one corner of a city block, with an art deco skyscraper rising between them, through successive setbacks, to a copper mansard roof, 70 stories above the street. If the crash of 1929 had not convinced the Fishers to scale down their histrionic self-advertisement, Kahn’s ornate masterwork would have been 30 floors higher than the contemporaneous slab-sided Penobscot Building (1928), which would remain Detroit’s tallest structure for half a century, until Henry Ford II hired John Portman to design his ill-fated Renaissance Center in the early ’70s….. Not that this matters much anymore. In the last half of the 20th century, Americans quit needing the kind of city expressed in Albert Kahn’s designs: grand in scale, decoratively overwrought, unaccommodating to the velocity of the automobile, to the new momentum of the culture. Both the YWCA and YMCA were demolished in the late ’90s; trees of heaven now grow through the collapsed roof of the National Theater; and in 2001 General Motors abandoned the outmoded world headquarters on West Grand Boulevard that it had occupied since 1923 (and which was then the second largest office building in the U.S.) and moved its vastly diminished corporate ranks to the RenCen....

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Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera at the Bowes Museum

Posted by on May 11, 2012 in Frida Kahlo, Past Exhibitions | 0 comments

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera at the Bowes Museum

An odd couple take over the former home of another odd couple. No wonder Frida Kahlo’s winking. The Guardian Northerner‘s arts ace Alan Sykes explains Frida Kahlo. Some character. If you haven’t already read Barbara Kingsolver’s ‘The Lacuna’, do. It’s a warmly imaginative account of the curious pair. Photograph: Lucienne Bloch Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera made a pretty odd couple – Rivera the much older, much travelled, much married friend of Modigliani and Picasso, Kahlo the Hungarian-Jewish-Spanish-Mexican surrealist painter from the Casa Azul. The Bowes Museum‘s founders John and Josephine Bowes weren’t exactly conventional either – he the race horse-owning illegitimate heir to 43,200 acres and a large chunk of the Durham coalfield, she a grande horizontale actress turned obsessive collector. According to the Bowes’ head of exhibitions, Vivien Vallack, the museum’s visitors are interested in photography exhibitions as well as the many other two and three dimensional delights of their treasure house in the Dales. So when the Mexican Embassy offered her the chance to be the only place in Britain to host an exhibition of photographs documenting the extraordinary lives of Kahlo and Rivera, she jumped at it. The long and bloody Mexican revolution was fortunate in having Rivera as its unofficial “artist in residence” – with Jacques-Louis David and the French revolution arguably the only other one with a great artist on hand to record it. After Rivera’s early cubist period, he tended towards a socialist realist figuration, but his work can also be said to hark back to the fresco painting tradition of renaissance Italy – with workers and their struggles as the subject of his murals, rather than princes and their battles. Although a communist, he got on surprisingly well with American millionaires – he created “Detroit Industry”, a huge mural for Henry Ford, another for the New York Stock Exchange Luncheon Club, as well as a commission from the Rockefellers. In an act of astonishing vandalism, the Rockefeller Center in New York, having commissioned him to create “Man at the Crossroads” a giant mural for the ground floor wall of the centre, took exception to the fact that Rivera had inserted a portrait of Lenin, leading the managers to destroy the entire work. Rivera got his revenge, as he used his fee from the Rockefellers to paint another portrait of Lenin (this time with Trotsky) as part of a mural in the Independent Labour Institute in Mexico City. One of the photographs here shows Kahlo typing a letter of protest which Rivera is dictating about the removal of the mural. Frida Kahlo said: “I suffered two grave accidents in my life. One involved a bus, the other is Diego”. Diego was more than double her age when they met, and the marriage was stormy – or rather marriages, as they divorced and then got together again. It was while Rivera was working for Ford in Detroit that Kahlo painted Miscarriage in Detroit, one of the first of her self-portraits. Rivera said of it: Frida began work on a series of masterpieces which had no precedent in the history of art – paintings which exalted the feminine quality of truth, reality, cruelty and suffering. Never before had a woman put such agonized poetry on canvas as Frida did at this time in Detroit....

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