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ESSAY BY FRIDA KAHLO BIOGRAPHER HAYDEN HERRERA

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in News | 0 comments

ESSAY BY FRIDA KAHLO BIOGRAPHER HAYDEN HERRERA

“My Bartoli…I don’t know how to write love letters.  But I wanted to tell you that my whole being opened for you. Since I fell in love with you everything is transformed and is full of beauty…. love is like an aroma, like a current, like rain.  You know, my sky, you rain on me and I, like the earth, receive you. Mara”  — Frida Kahlo, October 1946 This group of twenty-five letters that the Mexican painter, Frida Kahlo wrote to a Spanish refugee named Jose Bartoli between August 1946, when she had just turned thirty-nine, and November 1949, show that she knew how to write love letters that flow with poetry and passion. Kahlo’s letters are steamy with unbridled sensuality and they are, like Kahlo’s paintings, extraordinarily direct and personal. They cry outwith a heart-breaking loneliness and with the misery of physical pain, for they were written while Kahlo was recuperating at home in Mexico City from a spinal fusion performed in June, 1946 at New York’s Hospital for Special Surgery. This was just one of several surgeries that never really cured her physical problems that stemmed from a 1925 bus accident that left the eighteen-year-old Kahlo a partial cripple. The agony of her spinal surgeries is expressed in Kahlo’s self-portraits starting with The Broken Column, 1944, in which a weeping Frida is pierced by nails and her body is opened up to reveal a crumbling Ionic column. This and other self-portraits speak not only of her wounded body but also of her acute solitude, her feeling of rage and sorrow at not being able to move easily and having to live so often confined within her home. Likewise her letters to Bartoli talk about feeling shut in, isolated, and immobile. But in both her letters and her self-portraits Kahlo defiant — she challenges us with her fierce gaze and with her determination to overcome misery. Tree of Hope, a double self-portrait painted in September and October, 1946, was, Kahlo said in an October 11 letter to her chief patron, Eduardo Morillo Safa who bought it, “nothing but the result of the damned operation.” Eight days later she wrote to Bartoli, who had recently left Mexico, about working on Tree of Hope: “I remembered your last words and I began to paint. I worked all morning and when I finished eating I kept on painting until there was no more light. But afterward I felt so tired and everything hurt.”  In Tree of Hope one Frida lies on a hospital trolley. The surgical incisions on her back are still open and bleeding. The other Frida, dressed in her habitual Tehuana costume, is strong. In one hand she holds the orthopedic corset that in her letters to Bartoli she cursed because wearing it was torture.  In her other hand she holds a flag on which she inscribed her motto, the first line of a song that she and Bartoli loved: “Tree of Hope Keep Firm.” Many of Kahlo’s letters to Bartoli mention the tree of hope, and almost every letter reveals her formidable will to keep firm. A photograph of herself that shesent toBartoli and thatshe inscribed with the words “tree of hope keep firm,” shows her sitting in the patio of her house in Coyoacan, a southern district...

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FRIDA KAHLO LOVE LETTERS SELL FOR $137,000 AT DOYLE NEW YORK

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Collections, Exhibitions, Frida Kahlo, History, News | 0 comments

FRIDA KAHLO LOVE LETTERS SELL FOR $137,000 AT DOYLE NEW YORK

A group of love letters written by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo sold for $137,000 at Doyle New York on April 15, 2015. The 25 letters were written by Frida Kahlo to Jose Bartoli, a Catalán émigré artist whom she met in New York. Many of the letters include keepsakes inserted by Kahlo, among them drawings, photographs, pressed flowers and other mementos. The successful bidder was a private collector in New York, who is also an artist and a great admirer of Frida Kahlo. These unpublished letters, dating from 1946 through 1949 and comprising more than 100 pages in Spanish, were secreted away and cherished by Bartoli until his death in 1995. They remained in the possession of Bartoli’s family, who made the decision to offer the letters at auction, 20 years after his death. Frida Kahlo met José Bartoli in New York while she was recuperating from spinal surgery stemming from a bus accident in her youth. Their love affair continued after Kahlo returned to Mexico to her beloved home, La Casa Azul, and her husband, artist Diego Rivera. The clandestine correspondence lasted for three years, aided by friends and Kahlo’s sister, Cristina, who had introduced the pair. The letters provide new and unique insights into the life and career one of the 20th century’s most important artists. Poetically composed with a touch of Kahlo’s characteristic surrealism, the letters offer illuminating information about some of her best-known paintings, including her 1946 Tree of Hope. They also poignantly refer to an unknown possible pregnancy, her post-surgery relationship with her husband, personal and professional struggles, and her unwavering love for Bartoli. In a letter from October 1946, Kahlo states, “My Bartoli…I don’t know how to write love letters. But I wanted to tell you that my whole being opened for you. Since I fell in love with you everything is transformed and is full of beauty…love is like an aroma, like a current, like rain. You know, my sky, you rain on me and I, like the earth, receive you.” Acclaimed Frida Kahlo biographer Hayden Herrera has recently written an essay profiling these letters. She describes them as “…steamy with unbridled sensuality and they are, like Kahlo’s paintings, extraordinarily direct and personal. They cry out with a heart-breaking loneliness and with the misery of physical pain…” The letters offer very personal revelations about Kahlo’s relationship with Rivera. Herrera states, “Although Kahlo was deeply attached to Rivera, these letters suggest that she would have left him in order to live with Bartoli. She told Bartoli that he gave her a kind of love that she had never experienced before. Her love for Bartoli was passionate, carnal, tender and maternal.” About José Bartoli, whom Herrera interviewed for her biography on Kahlo, she states, “Bartoli never lost his love for Frida. If you asked him about her, he would speak with great reverence, but also with restraint. All his life he treasured the little objects she gave him as tokens of her love and he kept all her letters.” Herrera continues, “Kahlo sometimes worries that Bartoli would find her letters to be childish, corny, and stupid. But, she tells him, love letters are never intelligent or stupid. Her letters are her ‘truth.’ She asks him to receive them ‘as if a little girl passing...

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Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico

Posted by on Apr 15, 2013 in Exhibitions, Frida Kahlo, News, Upcoming Exhibitions | 0 comments

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces

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Viva la Vida: The Art of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Posted by on Feb 1, 2013 in Upcoming Exhibitions | 0 comments

Viva la Vida: The Art of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Saturday, February 23, 2013 2:00 p.m. – Rich Theatre Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera each achieved international recognition in the history of modern art. Rarely, however, have their paintings been considered in relation to each another, largely due to the view that they worked in very different styles and with separate intentions. In celebration of the opening of Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting, Guest Curator Elliott H. King will present on the artistic relationship these artists shared during their twenty-five years together as a married couple. Although their approaches to painting differed, both were influenced early on by traditional European painting; both caught the attention of the international avant-garde; and both were passionately committed to Mexico’s indigenous people, traditions, and post-revolutionary values. Further, and perhaps most importantly, each steadfastly supported the other’s art, even amidst highly publicized personal and professional tumult. Through the pairing of works included in the Frida & Diego exhibition, King will expand upon two artists who individually may be familiar but about whom as a couple much remains to be said. This program is free and seating is limited. Tickets are available through the Woodruff Arts Center Box Office at 404-733-5000. Please note: tickets are limited to two per person. Tickets to the Museum are sold separately or free to members. Major funding to the High Museum of Art is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of the Fulton County Arts Council. Curator Elliott H....

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Expondrán vida y obra de Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo

Posted by on Nov 20, 2012 in Past Exhibitions | 0 comments

Expondrán vida y obra de Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo

El Centro Cultural del México Contemporáneo exhibirá una serie de piezas, entre óleos, maquetas, dibujos y fotografías que exploran las diferentes facetas que caracterizaron a esta pareja.

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Works by Diego Rivera and Fernando Botero lead Christie’s Latin American Sale

Posted by on Nov 5, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Works by Diego Rivera and Fernando Botero lead Christie’s Latin American Sale

NEW YORK, NY.- Christie’s Latin American Sale will take place on November 20 at 7:00 p.m. and November 21, at 10:00 a.m.

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Magna Ofrenda de Día de Muertos 2012

Posted by on Nov 3, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Magna Ofrenda de Día de Muertos 2012

Una vez más el Museo Diego Rivera-Anahuacalli se revistió de colores y simbolismo para recibir a los muertos

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Lives of Passion and Art: Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Posted by on Oct 30, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Lives of Passion and Art: Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera had one of the great love affairs in the art world. Only the power of their works of art matched the drama of their union.

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Primer Concurso de Calaveras en Piñata

Posted by on Oct 21, 2012 in News | 0 comments

Primer Concurso de Calaveras en Piñata

El Museo Diego Rivera-Anahuacalli invita al público a participar en el Primer Concurso de Calaveras en Piñata, conforme a las siguientes bases de participación:

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